Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again. Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier

Maxim preferred his coffee and his tea with two lumps of sugar and cream. – http://www.tangledpasta.net

 

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

Thus begins Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, with one of the most iconic openings in literature. The eeriness of the iambic hexameter structure of this first line of Rebecca underscores the hallucinatory sort of events the young second Mrs. de Winter attempts to unravel. While some readers swoon over the “romance” in Rebecca, the story is more Gothic suspense than it is romance. The character of Maxim de Winter, the wealthy, emotionally damaged widower who marries the 20-year-younger second Mrs. de Winter, barely functions as a fully engaged husband to his shy and naïve second wife. The second Mrs. de Winter’s attempts to better understand her husband’s erratic outbursts are thwarted either by Maxim himself, or by the malevolent housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers.

Rebecca’s narrator is the second Mrs. de Winter. How reliable a narrator we believe her to be is contingent on how much credibility the reader is willing to invest in her. We are more likely to believe the second Mrs. de Winter because she lacks previous experience with the Manderley estate and those in its orb. We might be willing to invest more in what she says because she views Manderley and Maxim de Winter without fully knowing what and who they are in the greater context of the narrative. Yet she on various occasions she plays fast and loose with the truth in order to deflect attention from herself. These lies continually make her appear an awkward juvenile. Maxim is inexorably linked to Manderley. He shares with his second wife that Manderley is his home; it is where he was born, where he grew up. Even though Maxim is wealthy enough to have remained either on the Cote d’Azur where they met, or in Italy where they honeymooned, he opts to take her to Manderley. He soon realizes it would have been better had they remained in Italy on a perennial honeymoon.

Throughout the course of their months at Manderley, it is evident that Maxim becomes more and more unhappy, likewise his young bride. He is haunted by events leading up to his first wife Rebecca’s death. The past continually rears its head at the most inopportune moments to send him either into a rage, like prior to the costume ball, or plunge him into despair, as when the young Mrs. de Winter insists on following Jasper the dog to the cottage by the sea. The reader fails to understand Maxim’s moody behavior, but inklings provide clues to dark secrets lurking within the man. While Maxim holds the key to aspects of the past, the dead Rebecca reveals herself to the reader as the narrative progresses. All is most certainly not what it appears or appeared to be in Rebecca. The shifting landscapes and slow unveiling of characters, coupled with plot twists keep generation after generation of readers enthralled in du Maurier’s classic story.

Ciao for now.

 

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! A New Book!

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My latest book Villa Fiore is now available on Amazon and on http://www.createspace.com! – http://www.tangledpasta.net

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

Hot off the press:

My new book Villa Fiore is now available on Amazon in a digital [e-book] format, and it is on http://www.createspace.com in a paperback version!

Here is a sneak peek at what Villa Fiore is about:

Rescue. Redemption. Renewal.

 Lorenzo “Renzo” Fiore unexpectedly inherited his family’s estate in a hillside town in Tuscany. Renzo got more than he bargained for in the form of debt, inquisitive townspeople, and an attractive newcomer to the village of Bella Fiore. Brainstorming ways to lessen the expenses of Villa Fiore results in a fresh business venture on the estate. Trials and tribulations test Renzo’s knack at balancing the various personalities and rhythms of this new lifestyle, while sexually arousing Renzo’s love as he explores the parameters of his relationship with a woman he met in the hospital.

The digital [e-book] Villa Fiore is free right now in Kindle Unlimited for a limited time. Villa Fiore in paperback is competitively priced at $4.99.

Feel free to write a review of Villa Fiore on Amazon!

Happy reading!

Ciao for now.

The Morning After

Close-up of a plate of Fettuccine Carbonara
While I like Carbonara made with spaghetti, fettuccine or linguine may be used. The long strands of pasta better absorb the mixture and make for an enhanced taste. – tangledpasta.net

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

One of my favorite go-to recipes is for Spaghetti Carbonara. No only is it easy, it is also delicious! The “Carbonara” in its name comes from the freshly ground black pepper used in the recipe. Growing up, pasta of any shape was doused with a hearty red sauce, a la Southern Italy, Calabrese-style. As I ventured forth into the world, well, at least to Northern and Central Italy, my gustatory senses awakened to the variations on Spaghetti Carbonara. It was cathartic! Spaghetti Carbonara is also cheap eats, depending upon the cook’s preference for pancetta [pricey], or bacon [not so pricey]. Another factor in cost is the type of cream one uses, if indeed, one adds cream at all, which the Romans do not. It depends upon my mood as to whether or not I use cream. If I decide I do, then I prefer half-and-half versus heavy cream. Whether or not one purchases the organic variety [a bit pricier than the non-organic version] may also ramp up the thriftiness of the pasta dish.

Imagine my delight on New Year’s morning when I read the NPR piece on Bacon, Eggs, Cheese – And Spaghetti? The Italian Twist on Hangover Cure! The essay gives some historical perspective on this classic dish at http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/01/507566978/bacon-eggs-cheese-and-spaghetti-the-italian-twist-on-a-hangover-cure.

No matter how you opt to make Spaghetti Carbonara, it will not only lessen the after effects of a hangover, but will taste delizioso! Below is my riff on the ubiquitous pasta dish.

Spaghetti Carbonara.

1-pound good quality spaghetti [De Cecco pasta is my favorite,]

1-2 tablespoons good quality olive oil

6-8 ounces pancetta, or good quality bacon

4 eggs [I prefer brown eggs, cage-free, grain fed]

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese [Parmigiano-Reggiano is my preference.]

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Cook the spaghetti according to the package directions.

As the spaghetti cooks, in a large frying pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Be careful not to burn the olive oil! Add the pancetta or the bacon. Cook until lightly browned, 3 minutes or so.

Take a large pasta bowl, and then beat and blend the eggs and cream. Next, stir in ½ cup of the Parmesan cheese the ground black pepper. Pour the drained spaghetti into the pasta bowl and mix together with the eggs and cream. Blend in the pancetta or bacon, and the drippings. Be sure to coat the spaghetti well with the wet mixture and the pancetta or bacon.

Serve hot.  Garnish with Italian flat leaf parsley. Pass the grated Parmesan cheese, and even additional ground black pepper on the side to taste. Buon appetito!

Ciao for now.

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The Power of Bucatini all’Amatriciana

Amatrice, Italy - Aug 25th, 2012: Majorettes celebrating for the annual "Pasta Fair" in the centre streets of Italian town
Amatrice, Italy – Aug 25th, 2012: Majorettes celebrating for the annual “Pasta Fair” in the centre streets of Italian town

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

The earthquake that devastated the small Italian towns of Amatrice, Accumoli, and Pescara del Tronto reminded Italians, who already have it emblazoned in their minds, that the seductive charm of Italy belies an ominous truth: She is vulnerable to devastating earthquakes. The last one occurred in 2012 in the province of Emilia Romagna. 2009’s massive earthquake nearly annihilated L’Aquila in the Abruzzi.

Beppe Severgnini, who writes for the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera, penned an insightful article entitled Italy’s Fragile Beauty. Tourists trek to Italy to take picture perfect photos of the glories of Rome, of the ethereal beauty of Venice, of the inspired artwork of Florence, and partake of Naples’ incomparable pizza. Yet underneath the superficial travels of tourists lurks what Italians know all too well: Earthquakes. Like the Walls of Jericho, those picturesque Italian towns balanced atop the Apennine Mountains might well come tumbling down when the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collide in Italy.

Years ago I asked my father about earthquakes in Italy. I was writing a report for a school assignment and I figured he might shed light on those massive rumblings. He had emigrated to the U.S. from Italy when he was 23, long before more sophisticated means of tracking earthquakes were in place. He explained that in his village in southern Italy, the only thing to do was to brace oneself in a doorway. This, he said, served only several members of a family of eight. There were not enough doorways for everyone in his family. The alternative was to flee into the streets, hardly appealing when large rocks rained down from the Apennine sky. A tornado was preferable to an earthquake, he informed me, for with a tornado shelter could be sought in a basement. Basements were not an option in his Italian village; it was all rocks below the houses.

The beguiling beauty of Italy and her people are dear to my heart. I have known quite a few people who stampeded through Italy to take their picture perfect photo of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, to ride in a Venetian gondola while snapping away at structures. Yet these travelers of several weeks rarely take the time to talk with the natives who live, breathe, and toil in this ancient landscape. Most of them are hastening with family and friends through the countryside, driving their way down the narrow roads. Took a quick tour of Rome – check. Trekked in Cinque Terre – check. Saw Michelangelo’s David in Florence – check. Plan next summer’s trip to another country – check. I prefer to position myself in one locale for a month or more, get to know the shopkeepers’ names, frequent the local eateries, settle in to the rhythms of the town and take in its sites. But mostly for me it is about the people; that is the true adventure.

Ergo, the most recent earthquake and its aftermath tremors reverberated with me. I wondered about those residents of Amatrice, how they had planned for the Festival Amatriciana, how within moments the rocks and structures had fallen over and around them. Yesterday I watched a news video of rescue workers pulling a golden retriever from the rubble ten days after the earthquake. The dog named Romeo emerged intact. Unlike Shakespeare’s ill-fated Romeo, this one wagged its tail as he shook off the earth’s dust. Overjoyed at finding life, the rescuers carried Romeo down the steep pile of rocks. Several days before, other rescuers had unearthed a cat alive. The cat’s name was Gioia, meaning Joy. That name captures the indomitable spirit of Italians, for they will overcome adversity and rise again, as they have always done.

Ciao for now.

 

Ice, Baby, Ice

A gelateria in Florence, Italy  www.tangledpasta.net
A gelateria in Florence, Italy http://www.tangledpasta.net

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

In the heat of the summer, during these dog days of summer, nothing cools the brow and the psyche like a frozen delight. Think snow-capped mountains, think winter snow in general, or think clean, shiny ice. Think ice cream. Think gelato.

NPR’s Audie Cornish conducted a fascinating interview with Francine Segan, a food historian who has tracked the history of frozen treats back to 3,000 B.C. when the Chinese mixed snow with fruit and beer. In the 10th century, Sarbat or sorbet as we know it, came to Sicily via an Arab invasion. The canny Italian scientist, Giammbatista della Porta, in 1561 experimented with ice and salt, and realized that this lowered temperature allowed for a creamy concoction, thereby creating gelato!

I am indebted to Giammbatista della Porta, who also has a very cool Italian name [no pun intended, but there it is]. The Florentines and the Romans both make indescribably delicious gelato. Since I cannot trek to Italy annually for the gelato I adore, I must settle for Whole Foods own gelato, which is none too shabby. Pistachio is my all-time favorite gelato, both inside and outside of Italy, followed by Stracciatella [which includes chocolate shavings] and Fragola [strawberry]. Italian law mandates that gelato must contain no less than 3.5% butterfat, which accounts for the fact that the incomparable Italian gelato triggers my taste buds in ways most U.S. gelato does not.

My proclivity for gelato does not exclude my periodic fondness for American ice cream. I would not dare profane this ice treat because I do indulge in particular flavors such as black raspberry, when I can find it, butter pecan, and vanilla bean. Low fat ice creams interest me not. If I’m going to indulge in frozen concoctions, I’m going for those with the butterfat; otherwise, it is like drinking skim milk, which looks like it has been waved over whole milk, and then been tossed with a bucket of water. Of course, this is purely personal preference: mine. A delicious ice creamery in Valparaiso, Indiana, called Valpo Velvet, makes smooth, deliciously rich ice cream – even black raspberry. When I’m in that charming town, inevitably I stop by Valpo Velvet’s ice cream shop, sit down and savor its rich ice cream.

While my heart belongs to gelato, in the end, it matters not which frozen treat cools a person off. What matters is the variety of choices to whet the appetite. I’m planning on a return to Italy within the next year or so. I cannot wait to luxuriate in its gelato! In the meantime, Whole Foods’ own gelato sates my gelato tooth.

Ciao for now.

 

Spirited Constellations: Travels

Spirited Constellations: Travels is now available in paperback! - www.tangledpasta.net
Spirited Constellations: Travels is now available in paperback! – http://www.tangledpasta.net

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

Spread the word:  Spirited Constellations: Travels is now available in paperback on Amazon!

MURDER. MUSIC. LUST.

Theodora D’Medici turned her floundering bookshop business into a thriving enterprise. Previously magical thinking had realized her past into her present. Now it has turned her present into the past in Italy as she finds herself trapped in a time travel with her modern-day insatiable lover and with her phantom lover.

Spirited Constellations: Travels is the second installment in a series of adult paranormal romance novels. If you like lusty heroines and provocative themes, then you will embrace Mary Anna Violi’s powerful vision of a world beyond Earth where rules of love and sex no longer apply. When Theodora attempts to come to terms with the time travel experience, and her real life lover and with her phantom lover, she finds that carnal knowledge can unleash forbidden pleasure when licentious attitudes rule.

Here is the link to Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Spirited-Constellations-Travels-Mary-Violi/dp/1534752579/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467837355&sr=8-1&keywords=Mary+Anna+Violi

Thank you for your patronage and happy reading!

Ciao for now.

 

 

Spirited Constellations: Travels

Spirited Constellations: Travels is now published and available on Amazon! -www.tangledpasta.net
Spirited Constellations: Travels is now published and available on Amazon! -www.tangledpasta.net
By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaViolli

Spirited Constellations: Travels

Hear ye! Hear ye! The second book in my Spirited Constellations series is now available on Amazon!

Purchase the e-book version of Spirited Constellations: Travels for the introductory price of $.99 for one week on Amazon and with Prime!

Spirited Constellations: Travels is a paranormal romance. In this second book in the series, Theodora D’Medici, her lover Danny Caruso, and her Phantom lover Giorgio Bellacqua travel back in time to Italy.

May your reading of Spirited Constellations: Travels be out of this world!

Thank you and Happy Reading!

Ciao for now