Italian Comfort Food

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The pasta bowl was filled to the top with Pasta e Fagioli, but I was hungry, and I had eaten most of it when I remembered I needed to snap a photo. – http://www.tangledpasta.net

By Mary Anna Violi | @MaryAnnaVioli

Maybe it had something to do with the death of one of my 48 first cousins last week. Perhaps the up and down warm and chilly weather affected me, or my usual spring melancholy at the end of a teaching semester accounted for it. Whatever the reason, I craved a Southern Italian food I had not made in a while: Pasta e Fagioli, otherwise known as Pasta and Beans. This filling, comforting dish of Italian tastiness is not complicated to make. In fact, Pasta e Fagioli can most likely be created from pantry items at home. Its ingredients are those I keep on hand. If I run out of an item, it is purchased the next time I stop at the grocery.

My guess is that I rather lost my taste for this classic Italian peasant dish when it became popular among affluent upscale types. Collectively those people were enough to make me lose my appetite when they seized upon our traditional food. After seeing my beloved Pasta e Fagioli on a restaurant menu priced at $5.00 to $10.00 a bowl, depending upon which part of the country I was in, it felt like a death knell had tolled. Having Pasta e Fagioli on a legitimate Italian restaurant menu did not faze me; it was seeing it printed on non-authentic Italian restaurant menus that saddened me.

Growing up in an Italian Catholic household, Pasta e Fagioli was standard Friday night fare since we were forbidden to eat meat or fowl in those years, although we could eat fish. There are as many variations on this Southern Italian classic as there are on vegetarian chili: every cook indulges in the chef’s prerogative when it comes to ingredients and consistency. Some prefer a thick Pasta e Fagioli, while others like it more in a soup form. I have always preferred it thick and hearty. However, now when I make Pasta e Fagioli, I use far less tomatoes than in years past. This is noted in the recipe included below.

Pasta e Fagioli

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped [or 2-teaspoons onion granules]

1 24-ounce bottle organic strained Italian tomatoes [or a 30-ounce can crushed Italian tomatoes]

1-1/2 teaspoons dried oregano

¼ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes

2-1/2 cups organic chicken stock

2 15-ounce cans cannellini beans

8 ounces organic elbow macaroni [or 8 ounces mini-farfalle]

1-teaspoon salt

1-teaspoon ground black pepper

Grana Padano cheese to taste

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Add garlic, and cook about a minute more, but do not burn the garlic. Stir in strained tomatoes, oregano, dried red pepper flakes, and chicken stock. Cover and cook to heat through, about 5-6 minutes. Add cannellini beans and simmer 10 minutes or so.
  2. Cook elbow macaroni in a large pot of salted, boiling water until nearly cooked, about 6 minutes. Add to mixture, and cook 20 minutes. Add salt and ground black pepper.
  3. Serve in pasta bowls with grated Grana Padano cheese on the side.

Buon appetito!

Ciao for now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Italian Comfort Food

  1. Lora Gohn

    This looks delish! My husband refuses to eat beans (crazy I know!) but I think I will make for myself and grandkids!

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